Probate Valuation Services Hackney London E2, E8

Probate Valuation of house contents or property by RICS Valuers: As one of the leading London probate valuation companies, Jeffrey Avery and Associates can provide fully comprehensive house contents valuation for probate and property valuation for probate in Hackney, E2, E8, and all surrounding areas. Our house contents valuations and property valuations for probate are carried out by qualified RICS valuers, thereby eliminating the risk of investigation by HMRC. With the recent appearance of many companies carrying out valuations by unqualified staff, it is essential for executors to verify that the valuation is carried out by a RICS qualified valuer so as to avoid any risk of penalites being incurred for an inaccurate valuation. Established for over 25 years, we have become one of the most recommended firms of probate valuers in the Hackney area.

Probate Valuation Hackney E2, E8: If you are an executor or administrator, and require a comprehensive and accurate probate valuation report, which is normally required by HMRC before probate can be granted, so that Inheritance Tax can be calculated, Jeffrey Avery and Associates can assist. We provide our service to members of the public, solicitors, and other legal professionals in all parts of Hackney.

Our probate valuation reports are prepared strictly in accordance with S.160 of the Inheritance Tax Act (1984), and will help to ensure that there are no delays in the granting of probate. If you require a probate valuation in Hackney, contact Jeffrey Avery for further advice. To fully understand how our probate services work, see our Probate Valuation Guide, and our Executors Information Page.

As professional probate valuers, we always ensure that that the use of our probate valuation services will result in accurate, timely and comprehensive probate evaluation reports.

For more information contact Jeffrey Avery on 0800 567 7769.

I was advised by my solicitor that, to avoid an IHT investigation, I should contact a qualified RICS valuer, to carry out a probate valuation of all the contents of my late father's property, but had no idea where to start. I called Jeffrey Avery and Associates and they arranged for a valuer to visit the property, and within a week I received a full written probate valuation report which was subsequently accepted by HMRC without problems.

I would not hesitate to recommend this service to anyone in the same situation.
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Steve Mulligan

Free Probate Advice and Quotation

Probate Services Hackney: Our valuers will be pleased to provide a verbal assessment, advice, and indication of value completely free of charge. If you require a full written probate valuation report for submission to HMRC for Inheritance Tax purposes, call us for a quotation. All fees are fixed before we start work, for your peace of mind.

We carry out probate valuations throughout the whole of Hackney.

Additional Services: Property Clearance

After we have provided a probate valuation and you have received a Grant of Probate, we can provide a Full House Clearance Service, and thoroughly and comprehensively clean both the buildings and the garden, so as to minimise delays and to simplify the process of the preparation of your property for sale or transfer.

Some interesting facts about Hackney E2, E8

Hackney Central is the central district of the London Borough of Hackney in London, England. It comprises the area roughly surrounding, and extending north from Mare Street. It is situated 4 miles (6.4 km) north east of Charing Cross. It is also the name of Hackney Central ward, an electoral division for Hackney Council.

Hackney Central is the area that once would have been known as Hackney Village. This was a place that flourished from the Tudor period, when principal members of the Court had their houses in the surrounding area, and King Henry VIII of England had a palace (located near the modern Lee Bridge Road roundabout). Hackney Central remained a popular resort for Londoners until the end of the Georgian era, when this suburb of London began to be completely built up. Railways, trams and factories brought an end to Hackney's rural atmosphere during the Victorian era, and its fortunes declined.

The industries of nearby Homerton and the Lee Valley have largely disappeared, leaving the NHS and local council as the largest employers. Successive waves of immigrants, both from abroad and within the United Kingdom, make modern Hackney a culturally vibrant part of inner London, with both the benefits and challenges that this brings.[1]

Extensive post-war redevelopment has replaced much of the housing stock, but the Georgian housing and Victorian terraces that remain have become popular again.

In 1727, Daniel Defoe said of the villages of Hackney “ All these, except the Wyck-house, are within a few years so encreas'd in buildings, and so fully inhabited, that there is no comparison to be made between their present and past state: Every separate hamlet is encreas'd, and some of them more than treble as big as formerly; Indeed as this whole town is included in the bills of mortality, tho' no where joining to London, it is in some respects to be call'd a part of it. This town is so remarkable for the retreat of wealthy citizens, that there is at this time near a hundred coaches kept in it; tho' I will not join with a certain satyrical author, who said of Hackney, that there were more coaches than Christians in it.[3] ”

Central Hackney was largely unchanged by Roman times, with Ermine Street passing to the west. The land was covered with open oak and hazel woodlands, with marshland around the rivers and streams that crossed the area. Hackney lay in the Catevallauni tribal territory. The name Hackney derives from a 5th or 6th century Saxon settlement known as Haca's ey - or raised ground in marshland.[4] This was due to the proximity of Hackney Brook, and was probably located on the higher ground around the later St Augustine's Tower. Hackney is not specifically mentioned in the Norman Domesday Book, as at that time it formed a part of the manor of Stepney. The medieval village was centred on the 13th century Templar church of St Augustine, which gave Church Street its name - the modern Narrow Way - where it crossed Hackney Brook and met with the north end of Mare Street (originally near the site of the modern town hall). In common with much of Hackney, it developed along a single street - meeting Homerton and Clapton in the north; and along the line of Mare Street in the south. Where it crossed Cambridge Heath towards Bethnal Green.

Little remains of early Hackney, except the Tudor St Augustine's Tower, which survives as Hackney's oldest building; and the positively medieval road network. The churchyard, Hackney Brook, and the surrounding villages prevented Hackney's expansion, and by 1605 the village had a lower rateable value than the other divisions of the parish. In Tudor times, there were a number of fine houses along Church Street, but many Tudor courtiers lived in nearby Homerton.[5] On the site of Brooke House college, in Clopton was sited one of Henry VIII's palaces, where his daughter Mary took the Oath of Supremacy. Her guardian was a Bryck Place Homerton resident, Ralph Sadleir who was also Henry's Principal Secretary of State.

A further cluster of houses existed in medieval times, where Well Street enters Mare Street. It was on open ground, to the north-east of here that the Loddiges family founded their extensive nursery business in the 18th century.

By 1724, while still consisting of a single street, there is an unbroken line of buildings, except by the churchyard and by the brook, with large gardens behind for the finer houses and inns. The 16th century church, despite galleries being installed, became too small for the needs of the parish, and parliament was petitioned in 1790 for a modern larger church to be built. This began in 1791 on a field to the north east of the old church, but was bedeviled by builders' bankruptcies and not finally completed until 1812–13 when the tower and porches were added. Further disaster struck in a fire of 1955.

In the churchyard stands the tomb of Francis Beaufort, devisor of the Beaufort scale; and that of John Hunter, the second governor of New South Wales. The Loddiges family also has a tomb in the churchyard, and memorials within the church. The parish burial register records the death of Anthony, a poore old negro, aged 105 in 1630. This is all that is known of Anthony, but he is the first recorded Black resident of Hackney.

The villages of Hackney, Lower Clapton and Homerton remained separated by fields into the 19th century. The fine houses remained, with large gardens behind. Artisans and labourers lived in cottages established in these gardens. There was not the room, or the will, for major rebuilding in the village. By 1800, St Thomas' Square, a Georgian square was laid out on the southern end of Mare Street. By the 20th century, these buildings had declined and were replaced with public housing.[7] An early 18th century mansion, now the New Landsdown Club, but once the headquarters of Elizabeth Fry's British Ladies' Society for Promoting the Reformation of Female Prisoners remains at 195 Mare Street. It is Grade II* listed, but in poor condition and on the English Heritage register of buildings at risk.[8] In neighbouring Homerton, (to the east of the churchyard) Sutton Place was built by 1806, near to Sutton House.

The rebuilding of the Church, on a field to the north of the village altered the course of the road and allowed the establishment of Clapton Square in 1816, in nearby Lower Clapton. Much of the area to the north and east of the churchyard now forms the Clapton Square Conservation Area.



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