House Clearance Wanstead London E11

House clearance Wanstead E11: As a London based company, Jeffrey Avery and Associates has been providing a complete house clearance service to members of the public, legal professionals, executors, and administrators, in Wanstead, E11 and surrounding areas, for over 35 years and is now one of the leading Wanstead house clearance companies. If you require any type of property to be cleared of its contents, and left clean and tidy so that it can be sold, or transferred to a landlord, we can help.

House Clearance in Wanstead: A fully comprehensive service.

We specialise in full house contents clearance. We can tackle any Wanstead house clearance job, of any size and in any location, even in circumstances where access is restricted. (eg Flats with no lifts,etc.)

We are also specialists in clutter clearance, and will be pleased to clear properties containing years of accumulated posessions, or which have abnormal amounts of general household items, sometimes as a result of illness, (eg compulsive Hoarding or OCD), or where the occupants were previously unwell and unable to care for themselves or their property, resulting in insanitary, dangerous conditions. We are expert clutter clearers.

I would like to thank Jeffrey Avery and Associates for the very careful, thorough and efficient job they made of clearing my late father's flat of his remaining possessions.

Extra to the excellent standard of the clearance, having dealt with Jeffrey personally, I found him to be only extremely helpful and responsive... Read more testimonials...

Becky Anderson.

Our Commitment to Quality

We are aware that a house clearance is often required in difficult circumstances, such as bereavement, and we pride ourselves on our expertise in carrying out our services with care, discretion, and with as little disruption as possible.

In particular, we will always:

Jeffrey Avery and Associates is a DOE registered waste carrier, and we comply with all applicable legislation with regard to the management and disposal of waste. We also carry full third party liability insurance.

Additional Services:

We provide a host of related, additional services, including deep cleaning of neglected houses, and the reinstatement of overgrown and out of control gardens, garden clearance, Central Heating, Water and Electricity Isolation, a comprehensive Locksmith Services, and a Hoarding Service. Our aim is to simplify the process of making your property ready for sale or transfer to a landlord.

Free advice and quotation

Our initial consultation and all our quotations are free and without obligation. Contact Jeffrey Avery on 0800 567 7769 for immediate attention.

Some interesting facts about Wanstead, London E11

Wanstead is a suburban area in the London Borough of Redbridge, North-East London. The main road going through Wanstead is the A12. The name is from the Anglo-Saxon words wænn and stede, meaning "settlement on a small hill".

The town has a largely suburban feel, containing open grasslands such as Wanstead Flats, and the woodland of Wanstead Park (part of Epping Forest). The park, with artificial lakes, was originally part of the estate of a large stately home Wanstead House, one of the finest Palladian mansions in Britain, from its size and splendour nicknamed the English Versailles, and the architectural inspiration for Mansion House, London. It was demolished after the bankruptcy of the owner, William Wellesley-Long, in 1824. It is also home to Wanstead Golf club, which has hosted many of the major events in the Essex County calendar. A notable landmark towards the northern edge of Wanstead is the former Wanstead Hospital building, now a housing complex. A small annex of the old Burns Unit is now used for research on Flu vaccines and bovine diseases.

Wanstead High Street is distinctive because of its many independent retailers, attracting shoppers from a wide area. Public houses include The George (which began life as the George and Dragon in the 18th century), The Cuckfield and Russells.

In 1707 the astronomer James Pound became rector of Wanstead. In 1717 the Royal Society lent Pound Huygens's 123-foot object-glass, which he set up in Wanstead Park. Pound's observations with it of the five known satellites of Saturn enabled Halley to correct their movements; and Newton employed, in the third edition of the Principia, his micrometrical measures of Jupiter's disc, of Saturn's disc and ring, and of the elongations of their satellites; and obtained from him data for correcting the places of the comet of 1680. Laplace also used Pound's observations of Jupiter's satellites for the determination of the planet's mass; and Pound himself compiled in 1719 a set of tables for the first satellite, into which he introduced an equation for the transmission of light.

Pound trained his sister's son, James Bradley, and many of their observations were made together, including the opposition of Mars in 1719, and the transit of Mercury on 29 October 1723. Their measurement of γ Virginis in 1718 was the first made of the components of a double star and was directed towards the determination of stellar parallax.

In 1727, Bradley embarked upon a series of observations using a telescope of his own erected at the rectory in Wanstead, now the site of Wanstead High School. This instrument had the advantage of a large field of view and he was able to obtain precise positions of a large number of stars that transited close to the zenith over the course of about two years. This established the existence of the phenomenon of aberration of light, and also allowed Bradley to formulate a set of rules that would allow the calculation of the effect on any given star at a specified date.

Although The George is not a particularly old building, there has been a pub on that site for hundreds of years. Set in to the side of the pub is a plaque dating from 1752 which was formerly part of an older pub building. The plaque is inscribed with the eccentrically spelled verse:

In Memory of
Ye Cherry Pey
As cost 1/2 a Guiney
Ye 17 of July
That day we had good cheer
I hope to so do maney a Year
R C 1752 D Jerry
There are various local legends explaining this curious plaque, including a tale of the theft of a cherry pie by local workmen who were caught and fined half a guinea (52.5p). However the most likely explanantion is that it was placed there by the landlord of 1752, David Jersey (corrupted by centuries of repainting and re-cutting the inscription to D Jerry on the plaque), commemorating a feast which included a huge cherry pie. Monstrous pies were a feature of 18th-century Essex rural festivals; the Tollesbury Gooseberry Pie festival is still in existence, and other inns around the edge of Epping Forest were famed for pies (rabbit pie at The Reindeer, Loughton, now Warren House, and pigeon pie at The King's Head, Chigwell). Wanstead was well-known for its cherry orchards as late as the 1830s, when they were mentioned by poet Thomas Hood, who lived in Wanstead 1832-5.

The Royal Commercial Travellers Schools were founded in 1845 by John Robert Cuffley, first in Wanstead, moving to Pinner in 1855. The schools at Wanstead provided housing, food, clothing and education for up to 130 children of commercial travellers who had died or became unable to earn their livelihood.

The Royal Merchant Navy School was founded in St George in the East, London in 1827 before moving to Hermon Hill, Wanstead in 1862. The new building provided for 300 orphans of Merchant Navy seamen. It moved again to Bearwood near Wokingham in 1921. The building then became a convent refuge for women and girls and later Wanstead Hospital.

Interesting facts source: Wikipedia



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