House Clearance Upminster Essex

House clearance Upminster Essex: As a London based company, Jeffrey Avery and Associates has been providing a complete house clearance service to members of the public, legal professionals, executors, and administrators, in Upminster, Essex and surrounding areas, for over 35 years and is now one of the leading Upminster house clearance companies. If you require any type of property to be cleared of its contents, and left clean and tidy so that it can be sold, or transferred to a landlord, we can help.

House Clearance in Upminster: A fully comprehensive service.

We specialise in full house contents clearance. We can tackle any Upminster house clearance job, of any size and in any location, even in circumstances where access is restricted. (eg Flats with no lifts,etc.)

We are also specialists in clutter clearance, and will be pleased to clear properties containing years of accumulated posessions, or which have abnormal amounts of general household items, sometimes as a result of illness, (eg compulsive Hoarding or OCD), or where the occupants were previously unwell and unable to care for themselves or their property, resulting in insanitary, dangerous conditions. We are expert clutter clearers.

I would like to thank Jeffrey Avery and Associates for the very careful, thorough and efficient job they made of clearing my late father's flat of his remaining possessions.

Extra to the excellent standard of the clearance, having dealt with Jeffrey personally, I found him to be only extremely helpful and responsive... Read more testimonials...

Becky Anderson.

Our Commitment to Quality

We are aware that a house clearance is often required in difficult circumstances, such as bereavement, and we pride ourselves on our expertise in carrying out our services with care, discretion, and with as little disruption as possible.

In particular, we will always:

Jeffrey Avery and Associates is a DOE registered waste carrier, and we comply with all applicable legislation with regard to the management and disposal of waste. We also carry full third party liability insurance.

Additional Services:

We provide a host of related, additional services, including deep cleaning of neglected houses, and the reinstatement of overgrown and out of control gardens, garden clearance, Central Heating, Water and Electricity Isolation, a comprehensive Locksmith Services, and a Hoarding Service. Our aim is to simplify the process of making your property ready for sale or transfer to a landlord.

Free advice and quotation

Our initial consultation and all our quotations are free and without obligation. Contact Jeffrey Avery on 0800 567 7769 for immediate attention.

Some interesting facts about Upminster, Essex

The placename Upminster is first recorded in 1062 as Upmynstre and is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Upmunstra. It is formed from Old English upp and mynster, meaning the large church on high ground. The high ground of the parish church being in relation to the valley of the River Ingrebourne and the Upminster Bridge over the river shares the name. An alternative explanation suggests the upp could refer to the relationship to a church at Barking or Tilbury.

There was an ancient farmstead from the 1st century to the 3rd century in the Upminster area, and agriculture was the predominant industry throughout the following centuries. The area was once wooded, but clearances in the 12th century gave more land over to arable farming; and by the 17th century there were a variety of crops and livestock. There was a growth in market gardening in the 19th century. There have been a number of windmills in Upminster and one of which, a smock mill built in 1803, remains. Local industry included a tannery, gravel extraction and a brick works that was connected to the railway station by a tramway in 1895.

The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway from Fenchurch Street was extended from Barking to Upminster in 1885. The underground Whitechapel and Bow Railway opened in 1902 and allowed through services of the Metropolitan District Railway to operate to Upminster. The Metropolitan District converted to electric trains in 1905 and services were cut back to East Ham. Delayed by World War I, electrified tracks were extended by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway to Upminster and through services resumed in 1932.

Upminster formed an ancient parish of 3,369 acres (1,363 ha) in the Chafford hundred of Essex. The parish vestry had meetings in the church until 1798, when they moved to the Bell Inn. The parish was divided into North and South wards by the Hornchurch to Cranham road. In 1836 the vestry lost control of poor relief, with Upminster becoming part of the Romford Poor Law Union and in 1875 the parish became part of Romford rural sanitary district. Following the Local Government Act 1894, the sanitary district became Romford Rural District and a parish council was formed of nine members, increasing to twelve by 1913 as the population had doubled. The parish council acquired the Clock House building on St Mary's Lane for use as offices in 1924. The parish formed part of the London Traffic Area from 1924 and the London Passenger Transport Area from 1933. In 1934 the parish council was abolished and Upminster was combined with other parishes to form part of Hornchurch Urban District. In 1965 the urban district was abolished and its former area was combined with that of Municipal Borough of Romford; and since then has formed part of the London Borough of Havering in Greater London.

The parish had three early centres of activity; the village around the church and the settlements of Hacton and Corbets Tey. The estates of Gaynes, New Place and Upminster Hall were purchased during the 17th century by merchants in the City of London. This caused a significant number of buildings in the town to be constructed or improved. Upkeep of the three bridges crossing the Ingrebourne were the responsibility of Upminster, as the adjacent Hornchurch parish was in the Havering liberty and was exempt from responsibility because of its charter. Although the opening of the station was key to the development of the suburb, land was not purchased for development until 10 acres (4.0 ha) were secured in 1901.

Electricity was introduced in Upminster in 1926. Gas main supply came from Romford in 1872 and from 1905 there was gas street lighting. The area was served by good spring water, with mains supply provided by the South Essex Waterworks Company from 1836. Works on the sewerage system began in 1899 in Upminster village and Corbets Tey. In 1922 sewage works for Upminster and Cranham were opened in Great Warley. Land for Upminster Park was purchased by the parish council in 1929.

The speed of sound was first accurately calculated in Upminster. The Reverend William Derham, Rector of Upminster, used a telescope from the tower of the church of St Laurence, Upminster to observe the flash of a distant shotgun being fired, and then measured the time until he heard the gunshot, and subsequently the distance the sound had travelled.

Interesting facts source: Wikipedia



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