House Clearance Thamesmead London SE2 and SE28

House clearance Thamesmead SE2 and SE28: As a London based company, Jeffrey Avery and Associates has been providing a complete house clearance service to members of the public, legal professionals, executors, and administrators, in Thamesmead, SE2 and SE28 and surrounding areas, for over 35 years and is now one of the leading Thamesmead house clearance companies. If you require any type of property to be cleared of its contents, and left clean and tidy so that it can be sold, or transferred to a landlord, we can help.

House Clearance in Thamesmead: A fully comprehensive service.

We specialise in full house contents clearance. We can tackle any Thamesmead house clearance job, of any size and in any location, even in circumstances where access is restricted. (eg Flats with no lifts,etc.)

We are also specialists in clutter clearance, and will be pleased to clear properties containing years of accumulated posessions, or which have abnormal amounts of general household items, sometimes as a result of illness, (eg compulsive Hoarding or OCD), or where the occupants were previously unwell and unable to care for themselves or their property, resulting in insanitary, dangerous conditions. We are expert clutter clearers.

I would like to thank Jeffrey Avery and Associates for the very careful, thorough and efficient job they made of clearing my late father's flat of his remaining possessions.

Extra to the excellent standard of the clearance, having dealt with Jeffrey personally, I found him to be only extremely helpful and responsive... Read more testimonials...

Becky Anderson.

Our Commitment to Quality

We are aware that a house clearance is often required in difficult circumstances, such as bereavement, and we pride ourselves on our expertise in carrying out our services with care, discretion, and with as little disruption as possible.

In particular, we will always:

Jeffrey Avery and Associates is a DOE registered waste carrier, and we comply with all applicable legislation with regard to the management and disposal of waste. We also carry full third party liability insurance.

Additional Services:

We provide a host of related, additional services, including deep cleaning of neglected houses, and the reinstatement of overgrown and out of control gardens, garden clearance, Central Heating, Water and Electricity Isolation, a comprehensive Locksmith Services, and a Hoarding Service. Our aim is to simplify the process of making your property ready for sale or transfer to a landlord.

Free advice and quotation

Our initial consultation and all our quotations are free and without obligation. Contact Jeffrey Avery on 0800 567 7769 for immediate attention.

Some interesting facts about Thamesmead, London SE2 and SE28

Most of the land area of Thamesmead previously formed about 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of the old Royal Arsenal site that extended over Plumstead Marshes and Erith Marshes. There is some evidence of prehistoric human occupation of the area - flints, animal bone and charcoal were found in bore holes around Western and Central Way in 1997 by the Museum of London Archaeological Service (MOLAS). In Roman times the river level was significantly lower, and work by MOLAS in 1997 around Summerton Way found evidence of field ditches and pottery and quernstones from Germany dating from around the 3rd or 4th century. After the Roman era, river levels rose again and the area reverted to marshland. According to Hasted, some areas of this marshland were drained by 1279 by the monks of Lesnes Abbey.

Between 1812 and 1816 a canal was built to take materials from the River Thames to Woolwich Royal Arsenal. Much of this canal has been filled in, but part remains in Thamesmead West and is now called the Broadwater.

Much of Thamesmead was initially built by the Greater London Council (GLC) for rent to families moving from overcrowded back-to-back Victorian housing (also referred to as slums) in south eastern parts of Inner London. The area had been inundated in the North Sea Flood of 1953, so the original design placed living accommodation at first floor level or above, used overhead walkways and left the ground level of buildings as garage space. The first residence was occupied in 1968, but already there were rain penetration problems. The pre-1974 parts of Thamesmead are a mix of modernist town houses, medium-rise and 12-storey blocks system-built in concrete, which have featured in various films due to their 'rough urban look'; the design of the newer buildings is more traditional and in brick.

When the GLC was abolished in 1986, its housing assets and the remaining undeveloped land was vested in a non-profit organisation Thamesmead Town Limited (TTL). TTL was a private company with an unusual form of governance. Its nine executive directors were local residents; as is normal, they periodically submitted themselves to re-election.

In 2000, TTL was wound down and two new organisations were created. In broad terms, Gallions Housing Association took over the ownership and management of the housing assets whilst Tilfen, later Tilfen Land, took over the remaining undeveloped land. Tilfen is jointly owned by Gallions and Trust Thamesmead.

District heating and cable radio broadcasting were pioneered in Thamesmead. The District Heating System was decommissioned around the turn of the millennium, with those properties connected to it having wet radiator systems installed by the landlord.

Thamesmead was built at the end of the 1960s. Efforts were made to solve the social problems that had already started to affect earlier estates. These were believed to be the result of working class communities from different areas being uprooted from close knit communities, then sent to remote estates many miles from where they previously lived so they knew nobody. The design of the estates meant people would rarely see their neighbours as they would have done in the 'back to back' Victorian housing they probably lived in before. The solution proposed was that once the initial residents had moved in their families would be given priority for new housing when it became available. However this fell foul of race discrimination legislation; as the initial residents were almost certainly white this selection procedure reduced the chances of applicants who weren't white, so when challenged in court by the Commission for Racial Equality it was judged to be illegal.

Other radical ideas were those of the GLC division architect Robert Rigg, including one taken from housing complexes in Sweden, where it was believed that lakes and canals helped to lower levels of crime and vandalism, mainly among the young. This led to the use of water in the estate as a calming influence on the residents.

Design failure was the almost complete lack of shopping facilities and banks, with only a small number of 'corner-shop' sized outlets initially being built in Tavy Bridge. From the start Thamesmead was cut off from Abbey Wood the nearest town, with shopping facilities by a railway line over which a 4 lane bridge was built to overcome in the early 70's. It was then cut in two by the building of the A2016 a 4 lane dual carriageway by-pass of the Woolwich to Erith section of the A206 though on leaving Woolwich only got as far as the industrial part of lower Belvedere (the extension to Erith was opened in 1999). Still, residential building continued, this time on the other side of the A2016, which effectively cut this part of Thamesmead off from any form of rail travel to central London. In time more facilities developed with a supermarket and retail park near Gallions Reach. Bus services were improved and people living on Thamesmead are now easily able to reach Abbey Wood Station, which is a main stop on the line. Thamesmead has become an easy place to commute from.

Despite early proposals for the Jubilee Line Extension to go to Thamesmead, via the Isle of Dogs and the Royal Docks, Thamesmead was not included and after reaching the Greenwich Peninsula, the line then heads north to Stratford, London (via Canning Town and West Ham), despite Stratford also being on the major Central Line tube link into London. The main alleged reason for this decision was that many workers in Canary Wharf lived in Essex and could change from National Rail to the Jubilee Line at Stratford, London and West Ham. However, other workers do reside in Thamesmead and are left to rely on the bus.

Thamesmead is also cut off from the north of the River Thames and is in the centre of the 15 mile gap between the Blackwall Tunnel and the Dartford Tunnel/QE2 Bridge. Various proposals have been made for a new river crossing, the closest of which was in the late 1980s, when there was a controversial proposal to alter the shape of London's South Circular inner orbital road so it would run through Oxleas Woods. Houses in Plumstead were compulsorily purchased but the plans fell through. Since then, Thamesmead has grown significantly, limiting the number of potential sites for a new river crossing.

Thamesmead was designed around futuristic ideas, and indeed, looked impressive at first from a distance. It was provided walkways between its blocks of housing and later between sections in North Thamesmead. The walkways quickly became littered and abused. They were not considered safe places to walk. Pathways set out for people to walk on were put in without regard to how people would wish to get about, so some were ignored in favour of more direct routes over grassed areas.

Interesting facts source: Wikipedia



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