House Clearance Southwark London SE1 and SE5

House clearance Southwark SE1 and SE5: As a London based company, Jeffrey Avery and Associates has been providing a complete house clearance service to members of the public, legal professionals, executors, and administrators, in Southwark, SE1 and SE5 and surrounding areas, for over 35 years and is now one of the leading Southwark house clearance companies. If you require any type of property to be cleared of its contents, and left clean and tidy so that it can be sold, or transferred to a landlord, we can help.

House Clearance in Southwark: A fully comprehensive service.

We specialise in full house contents clearance. We can tackle any Southwark house clearance job, of any size and in any location, even in circumstances where access is restricted. (eg Flats with no lifts,etc.)

We are also specialists in clutter clearance, and will be pleased to clear properties containing years of accumulated posessions, or which have abnormal amounts of general household items, sometimes as a result of illness, (eg compulsive Hoarding or OCD), or where the occupants were previously unwell and unable to care for themselves or their property, resulting in insanitary, dangerous conditions. We are expert clutter clearers.

I would like to thank Jeffrey Avery and Associates for the very careful, thorough and efficient job they made of clearing my late father's flat of his remaining possessions.

Extra to the excellent standard of the clearance, having dealt with Jeffrey personally, I found him to be only extremely helpful and responsive... Read more testimonials...

Becky Anderson.

Our Commitment to Quality

We are aware that a house clearance is often required in difficult circumstances, such as bereavement, and we pride ourselves on our expertise in carrying out our services with care, discretion, and with as little disruption as possible.

In particular, we will always:

Jeffrey Avery and Associates is a DOE registered waste carrier, and we comply with all applicable legislation with regard to the management and disposal of waste. We also carry full third party liability insurance.

Additional Services:

We provide a host of related, additional services, including deep cleaning of neglected houses, and the reinstatement of overgrown and out of control gardens, garden clearance, Central Heating, Water and Electricity Isolation, a comprehensive Locksmith Services, and a Hoarding Service. Our aim is to simplify the process of making your property ready for sale or transfer to a landlord.

Free advice and quotation

Our initial consultation and all our quotations are free and without obligation. Contact Jeffrey Avery on 0800 567 7769 for immediate attention.

Some interesting facts about Southwark, London SE1 and SE5

Southwark is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Sudweca. The name means 'southern defensive work'. It is formed from the Old English 'sūth' and 'weorc'. The southern location is in reference to the City of London to the north, Southwark being at the southern end of London Bridge. The name Suthriganaweorc is recorded for the area in the 10th century and means 'fort of the men of Surrey'. The name has been used for various areas of civil administration, including the ancient Borough of Southwark, the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark and the current London Borough of Southwark. The ancient borough of Southwark was also known simply as The Borough and this name - or Borough - has persisted as an alternative name for the area. Southwark was simultaneously known as the Ward of Bridge Without from 1550 to 1978.

Southwark is on a previously marshy area south of the River Thames. Recent excavation has revealed prehistoric activity including evidence of early ploughing, burial mounds and ritual activity. The area was originally a series of islands in the River Thames. This formed the best place to bridge the Thames and the area became an important part of Londinium owing its importance to its position as the endpoint of the Roman London Bridge. Two Roman roads, Stane Street and Watling Street, met at Southwark in what is now Borough High Street. Archaeological work at Tabard Street in 2004 discovered a plaque with the earliest reference to 'London' from the Roman period on it. Londinium was abandoned at the end of the Roman occupation in the early fifth century and both the city and its bridge collapsed in decay. Archaeologically, evidence of settlement is replaced by a largely featureless soil called the Dark Earth which probably (although this is contested) represents an urban area abandoned.

Southwark appears to recover only during the time of King Alfred and his successors. Sometime about 886 AD, the 'burh' of Southwark was created and the Roman City area reoccupied. It was probably fortified to defend the bridge and hence the re-emerging City of London to the north. This defensive role is highlighted by the use of the bridge in 1016 as a defence against King Sweyn and his son King Cnut by Ethelred the Unready and again, in 1066, against King William the Conqueror. He failed to force the bridge during the Norman Conquest of England, but Southwark was devastated.

Southwark appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 as held by several Surrey manors. Its assets were: The Bishop Odo of Bayeux held the monastery (the site of the Cathedral), the 'tide-way' - which still exists as St Mary Overy dock; the King owned the 'church' (probably St Olave's) and its 'tidal stream' (St Olave's Dock); the dues of the 'waterway' or mooring place were shared between the 'King' and Earl Godwin; the King also had the 'toll' of the strand; and the 'men of Southwark' had the right to a 'haw and its toll'. Southwark's value to the King was £16. Much of Southwark was originally owned by the church - the greatest reminder of monastic London is Southwark Cathedral, originally the priory of St Mary Overy.

During the early Middle Ages, Southwark developed and was one of the four Surrey towns which returned Members of Parliament for the first commons assembly in 1295. An important market occupied the High Street from some time in the 13th century, which was controlled by the City's officers - it was later removed in order to improve traffic to the Bridge, under a separate Trust by Act of Parliament of 1756 as the Borough Market on the present site. The area was renowned for its inns, especially The Tabard, from which Chaucer's pilgrims set off on their journey in The Canterbury Tales.

Just west of the Bridge was the 'Clink Liberty' manor, which was never controlled by the City, technically held under the Bishopric of Winchester's nominal authority. This area therefore became the entertainment district for London, and it was also the red-light area. In 1587, Southwark was given its first playhouse theatre, The Rose. The Rose was set up by a famous local businessman, Philip Henslowe, and it soon became a very popular place of entertainment for all classes of Londoners. Both Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare, two of the finest writers of the Elizabethan age, worked at the Rose.

In 1599, Shakespeare's Globe Theatre was erected on the Bankside in the Clink Liberty, though it burned down in 1613. A modern replica, also called the Globe, has been built near the original site. Southwark was also a favourite area for entertainment such as bull and bear-baiting. The impressario in the later Elizabethan period for these entertainments was Shakespeare's colleague Edward Alleyn, who left many local charitable endowments, most notably Dulwich College.

On 26 May 1676, ten years after the Great Fire of London, a great fire broke out, which continued for 17 hours before houses were blown up to create fire breaks. King Charles II and his brother the Duke of York were involved in the effort.

There was also a famous fair in Southwark which took place near the Church of St George the Martyr. William Hogarth depicted this fair in his engraving of Southwark Fair (1733).

Southwark was also the location of several prisons, including those of the Crown or 'Prerogative Courts', the Marshalsea and King's Bench prisons, that of the local manors courts e.g. Borough Compter, The Clink, and the Surrey county gaol originally housed at the 'White Lion Inn' (also called informally the 'Borough Gaol') and eventually at Horsemonger Lane Gaol.

One other local family is of note - the Harvards. John Harvard went to the local parish free school of St Saviour's and on to Cambridge. He migrated to the Massachusetts Colony and left his library and the residue of his will to the new college, named after him as its first benefactor. Harvard University maintains a link, having paid for a memorial chapel within Southwark Cathedral (his family's parish church), and where their UK-based alumni hold services. John Harvard's mother's house is in Stratford upon Avon.

In 1838 the first railway for the London area was created, planned to run from Southwark at London Bridge station to Greenwich only.

In 1861, another Great Fire of Southwark destroyed a large number of buildings between Tooley Street and the Thames, including those around Hays Wharf, where Hays Galleria was later built, and blocks to the west almost as far as St Olave's Church.

The first deep level London 'tube' underground line was 'The City and South London Railway', now the City Branch of the Northern Line, opened in 1890, running from King William Street through Borough to Kennington. Southwark, since 1999, is also now serviced by Southwark and London Bridge stations on the Jubilee Line.

Interesting facts source: Wikipedia



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