House Clearance Soho London W1

House clearance Soho W1: As a London based company, Jeffrey Avery and Associates has been providing a complete house clearance service to members of the public, legal professionals, executors, and administrators, in Soho, W1 and surrounding areas, for over 35 years and is now one of the leading Soho house clearance companies. If you require any type of property to be cleared of its contents, and left clean and tidy so that it can be sold, or transferred to a landlord, we can help.

House Clearance in Soho: A fully comprehensive service.

We specialise in full house contents clearance. We can tackle any Soho house clearance job, of any size and in any location, even in circumstances where access is restricted. (eg Flats with no lifts,etc.)

We are also specialists in clutter clearance, and will be pleased to clear properties containing years of accumulated posessions, or which have abnormal amounts of general household items, sometimes as a result of illness, (eg compulsive Hoarding or OCD), or where the occupants were previously unwell and unable to care for themselves or their property, resulting in insanitary, dangerous conditions. We are expert clutter clearers.

I would like to thank Jeffrey Avery and Associates for the very careful, thorough and efficient job they made of clearing my late father's flat of his remaining possessions.

Extra to the excellent standard of the clearance, having dealt with Jeffrey personally, I found him to be only extremely helpful and responsive... Read more testimonials...

Becky Anderson.

Our Commitment to Quality

We are aware that a house clearance is often required in difficult circumstances, such as bereavement, and we pride ourselves on our expertise in carrying out our services with care, discretion, and with as little disruption as possible.

In particular, we will always:

Jeffrey Avery and Associates is a DOE registered waste carrier, and we comply with all applicable legislation with regard to the management and disposal of waste. We also carry full third party liability insurance.

Additional Services:

We provide a host of related, additional services, including deep cleaning of neglected houses, and the reinstatement of overgrown and out of control gardens, garden clearance, Central Heating, Water and Electricity Isolation, a comprehensive Locksmith Services, and a Hoarding Service. Our aim is to simplify the process of making your property ready for sale or transfer to a landlord.

Free advice and quotation

Our initial consultation and all our quotations are free and without obligation. Contact Jeffrey Avery on 0800 567 7769 for immediate attention.

Some interesting facts about Soho, London W1

Soho is a small, multicultural area of central London; a home to industry, commerce, culture and entertainment, as well as a residential area for both rich and poor. It has clubs, including the former Chinawhite nightclub; public houses; bars; restaurants; a few sex shops scattered amongst them; and late-night coffee shops that give the streets an "open-all-night" feel at the weekends. Many Soho weekends are busy enough to warrant closing off of some of the streets to vehicles; Westminster Council pedestrianised parts of Soho in the mid-1990s, but later removed much of it, apparently after complaints of loss of trade from local businesses.

Record shops cluster in the area around Berwick Street, with shops such as Blackmarket Records and Vinyl Junkies. Soho is also the home of London's main gay village, around Old Compton Street, where there are dozens of businesses thriving on the pink pound. On 30 April 1999, the Admiral Duncan pub on Old Compton Street, which serves the gay community, was damaged by a nail bomb planted by neo-Nazi David Copeland. It left three dead (two of whom were heterosexual) and 30 injured.

Soho is home to religious and spiritual groups, notably St Anne's Church on Dean Street (damaged by a V1 flying bomb during World War II, and re-opened in 1990), St Patrick's Church in Soho Square (founded by Irish immigrants in the 19th century), City Gates Church with their centre in Greens Court, the Hare Krishna Temple off Soho Square and a small mosque on Berwick Street.

On Valentine's Day 2006, a campaign was launched to drive business back into the heart of Soho. The campaign, called I Love Soho, was created by marketing manager Prannay Rughani (who also heads up the Paramount Pictures licensed multi-million pound Cheers bars in Europe, and in addition, the Soho Clubs and Bars Group), and features a web-site (www.ilovesoho.co.uk). The campaign was launched at the former Raymond's Revue Bar in Walkers Court made famous by its strip licence and neons, with such celebrities in attendance as Charlotte Church, Amy Winehouse and Paris Hilton. I Love Soho is backed by the former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, the Soho Society, Westminster Council and Visit London.

Gerrard Street is the centre of London's Chinatown, a mix of import companies and restaurants (including Lee Ho Fook's, mentioned in Warren Zevon's song "Werewolves of London"). Street festivals are held throughout the year, most notably on the Chinese New Year.

Soho is near the heart of London's theatre area, and is a centre of the independent film and video industry as well as the television and film post-production industry. It is home to Soho Theatre, built in 2000 to present new plays and stand-up comedy. The British Board of Film Classification, formerly known as the British Board of Film Censors, can be found in Soho Square.

Soho is criss-crossed by a rooftop telecommunication network, and below ground level with fibre optics making up Sohonet, which connects the Soho media and post-production community to British film studio locations such as Pinewood Studios and Shepperton Studios, and to other major production centres such as Rome, New York City, Los Angeles, Sydney and Wellington, New Zealand.

There are also plans by Westminster Council to deploy high-bandwidth Wi-Fi networks in Soho as part of a programme to further encourage the development of the area as a centre for media and technology industries.

The Soho area has been at the heart of London's sex industry for over 200 years; between 1778 and 1801 21 Soho Square was location of The White House, an infamous magic brothel described by Henry Mayhew as "a notorious place of ill-fame".

Before the introduction of the Street Offences Act in 1959, prostitutes packed the streets and alleys of Soho and by the early sixties the area was home to nearly a hundred strip clubs and almost every doorway in Soho had little postcards advertising "Large Chest for Sale" or "French Lessons Given". These were known as "walk ups". With prostitution driven off the streets, many clubs such as The Blue Lagoon became prostitution fronts. The Metropolitan Police Vice squad at that time suffered from corrupt police officers involved with enforcing organised crime control of the area, but simultaneously accepting "back-handers" or bribes.

Clip joints also surfaced in the 1960s; these establishments sold coloured water as champagne with the promise of sex to follow, thus fleecing tourists looking for a "good time". Also in 1960, London's first sex cinema theatre, the Compton Cinema Club (a membership only club to get around the law) opened at 56 Old Compton Street. It was owned by Michael Klinger and Tony Tenser who produced many of the early Roman Polanski films such as Cul-de-sac (1966). Michael Klinger also owned the Heaven and Hell hostess club (which had earlier been just a beatnik club) across the road and a few doors down from the 2I's on the corner of Old Compton Street and Dean Street.

Harrison Marks, a “glamour photographer” and girlie magazine publisher, had a photographic gallery located at No. 4 Gerrard Street and published several magazines such as Kamera, which sold from the late fifties till 1968. The model Pamela Green prompted him to take up nude photography, and she remained the creative force in their business until they split in 1967. The content, however, by today’s standard is very innocent.

By the mid-seventies, the sex shops had grown from the handful opened by Carl Slack in the early sixties to a total of fifty-nine sex shops which then dominated the square mile. Some had secret backrooms selling hardcore photographs, Beeline Books (published in America by David Zentner) and Olympia Press editions.

By the 1980s, purges of the police force along with a tightening of licensing controls by the City of Westminster led to a crackdown on these illegal premises. By 2000, a substantial relaxation of general censorship, and the licensing or closing of unlicensed sex shops had reduced the red-light area to just a small area around Brewer Street and Berwick Street. Several strip clubs in the area were reported in London's Evening Standard newspaper in February 2003 to still be rip-offs (known as clip joints), aiming to intimidate customers into paying for absurdly over-priced drinks and very mild 'erotic entertainment'. Prostitution is still widespread in parts of Soho, with several buildings used as brothels, and there is a persistent problem with drug dealing on some street corners.

Soho continues to be the centre of the sex industry in London, and features numerous licenced sex shops. There is a clip joint on Tisbury Court and an adult cinema nearby. Prostitutes are widely available, operating in studio flats. These are sign-posted by fluorescent "model" signs at street level.

Interesting facts source: Wikipedia



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